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Tools and Equipment

Now I have a metal lathe, what should I make?

Discussion of tools and equipment for gunsmithing and refinishing of Mosin Nagant Rifles

Re: Now I have a metal lathe, what should I make?

Postby Imakethings » Sat Aug 31, 2013 6:54 pm

farmerboy,
I already figured out how to take care of that issue. See:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collet

Essentially make a very slightly tapered and threaded exterior, slice into 3 or 4 sections and torque a nut on the outside. You get much greater contact area with the surface of the barrel and can torque the hell out of it.

If I do a hex suppressor I can hide the collet by matching it up with the nut.
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Re: Now I have a metal lathe, what should I make?

Postby farmerboy78 » Sun Sep 01, 2013 3:11 am

That's essentially how I thought about it also... I want one
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Re: Now I have a metal lathe, what should I make?

Postby Imakethings » Sun Sep 01, 2013 4:46 pm

Update:

Got the prep work done on the wooden form to cast the muzzle brake, once the positive form and molds are done I'll try to post pictures.

If you're wondering why I'm casting the shape rather than purchasing a block of aluminum, it's because I'm a cheap bastard and it's easier to reproduce if I like the design/function of it and I have the stuff to do it.
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Re: Now I have a metal lathe, what should I make?

Postby Marauder 1 » Sun Sep 01, 2013 5:41 pm

I'd be a little worried about the integrity of cast materials do to the fact you'll have impurities introduced as well as the possibility of uneven cooling. Please be very careful if you use a cast muzzle break, a minor flaw could create a very unsafe condition.

Mark
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Re: Now I have a metal lathe, what should I make?

Postby Imakethings » Sun Sep 01, 2013 9:26 pm

Marauder 1 wrote:I'd be a little worried about the integrity of cast materials do to the fact you'll have impurities introduced as well as the possibility of uneven cooling. Please be very careful if you use a cast muzzle break, a minor flaw could create a very unsafe condition.

Mark


I've got a bit of experience with casting and have done a few small engine parts out of aluminum in the past, I think I can manage to avoid any major issue.
All the same though I'll make it a point to pressure check it before I go too far on the milling just to be on the safe side.

Thanks for bringing up that point, I wouldn't have normally considered it or checked on it.
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Re: Now I have a metal lathe, what should I make?

Postby Imakethings » Thu Sep 05, 2013 11:01 pm

Update:

Pressure testing on my casting revealed two weak-points, rather than cast another I'm just going to do it out of steel.
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Re: Now I have a metal lathe, what should I make?

Postby Shepard » Fri Sep 06, 2013 5:46 am

When designing and engineering a brake -- the higher the level of efficiency the better or stronger attachment to the barrel. At the same time to increase the function of the brake the bore hole should be only a few thousandths larger then the bullet going thru it. Bullet = .311 brake = .341 = .020 clearance A twist on brake fits every barrel differently, or should I say center up on the bore so the hole in the brake gets bigger to overcome this problem. Then efficiency suffers.
Consider threading the brake your designing. It's stronger -- holds tolerances better -- and most of all it can be done on a lathe.
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Re: Now I have a metal lathe, what should I make?

Postby Imakethings » Fri Sep 06, 2013 7:29 am

Shepard wrote:When designing and engineering a brake -- the higher the level of efficiency the better or stronger attachment to the barrel. At the same time to increase the function of the brake the bore hole should be only a few thousandths larger then the bullet going thru it. Bullet = .311 brake = .341 = .020 clearance A twist on brake fits every barrel differently, or should I say center up on the bore so the hole in the brake gets bigger to overcome this problem. Then efficiency suffers.
Consider threading the brake your designing. It's stronger -- holds tolerances better -- and most of all it can be done on a lathe.


Shepard,
I do understand that there is going to be an avoidable amount of 'slop' due to the fitment of the brake with my current attachment scheme. I'm trying to avoid having to thread the barrel, I want it to be as close to universal as I can manage. Do you think making a stepped guide pin (1/2 in the barrel, 1/2 extending from the barrel to center and align the brake), would resolve some of the tolerance issues :?:
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Re: Now I have a metal lathe, what should I make?

Postby Imakethings » Thu Sep 26, 2013 12:02 am

Update:

First one has failed, it didn't look right and I didn't like the alignment on it enough so that I was too nervous about it to try any shots.
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Re: Now I have a metal lathe, what should I make?

Postby jollyroger43 » Wed Jun 18, 2014 12:06 am

How about a tap for the receiver threads. .975x16 with 60 degree thread pitch. Then I could rent it from you to fix the threads on my receiver. I messed one up when I got to aggressive trying to install a Mcgowan heavy barrel. I just ordered another receiver from Pat Burns but I hate to junk this one. Can you help me out?
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